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Carol is a Physiotherapist and is affiliated to the Department for Rehabilitation and Sport Sciences, in the Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bournemouth University. Her research is aimed at improving the lives of those who experience pain in a variety of situations and conditions. With reference to understanding pain and the nonpharmacological management of pain. Her research interests are broadly aimed at empowering people to lead healthier lives and by informing the design of strategies that better support self-management. One theme is the translation of this knowledge to better support women to self-manage pain in labour and reduce obstetric interventions. Another strand is to use digital tools and behavioural theories to enhance rehabilitation, balance and exercise adherence aimed at improving the holistic health of populations to ensure healthy levels of physical activity are maintained through life. She represents the BU Allied Health Professionals (AHP) on the Dorset Integrated Care Services AHP Council. She is the senate representative on the Bournemouth University Board.
Carol is committed to supporting AHP careers across Dorset by encouraging greater involvement in research through excellent UG, PG and PGR opportunities. She is a BU representative on the NIHR ARC Wessex Training committee which aims to build research capacity and promote leadership. She has presented her work nationally and internationally has received funding in research and education for undertaking and disseminating research.
After completing an MSc in Physiotherapy at UCL, and with more than 20 years clinical experience Carol joined BU as a Lecturer practitioner in 2005. She completed her PhD in 2012, took up a fulltime academic position as a Senior Lecturer and Framework leader in 2013, promoted to Associate Professor and Head of Department from 2015-2021 and promoted to Professor in 2019. Carol’s main international collaboration is with Sri Ramachandra, Chennai, India.

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