Skip to main content

Damien Homer – Doctor of Education graduate

“The attraction of the EdD was that I knew it would help me develop as a person and help me to achieve new goals. Other attractions included the ‘cohort’ nature of the EdD programme and that you felt part of a group, rather than being on your own through your doctoral journey. The structure of the EdD was great as it was built around deadlines for formative assignments, which I needed as I worked full-time.

“I self-funded my EdD as the institutions I worked in during the course did not provide funding. This was challenging but I consider the fees to be relatively low in comparison to other types of postgraduate studies. Most of my peers on the course received funding, or partial funding, from their institutions, and Bournemouth University allowed me to pay my fees in instalments.

The EdD team have been fantastic in making sure I kept on track during all those long weekends and evenings I spent in the library.

“I completed my EdD whilst working full-time and with a young family. I also moved job roles from further education to the civil service, local government, and finally to work in higher education at a Russell Group university. This was a lot to take on but the EdD team have been fantastic in making sure I kept on track during all those long weekends and evenings I spent in the library.

“I am sure that many of the jobs for which I have been shortlisted, interviewed and then successfully gained have been, at least in part, due to my undertaking a doctorate. This isn’t just within the field of higher education – many different employers they want to see things which make you stand out from the crowd. With increasing numbers of people having postgraduate qualifications, such as Master’s degrees, an EdD can ensure that you demonstrate a level of skills, knowledge and ability that many other people do not have.”