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Check your exam timetable

January, summer and resit exam dates

Most people experience pressure, stress and anxiety when it comes to exams. Whilst a certain amount of pressure is good for us and helps us to perform well, it is important to keep some balance and perspective.

Read through the Revision & Exams study guide and organise your revision time. Planning ahead will mean you can keep to a sensible schedule. Check your assessment details via Brightspace to ensure that you know exactly when they are taking place. Don't feel you have to spend every waking hour studying, revising well means revising wisely and balancing work with exercise and relaxation. We've also put together some tips and techniques below to help you to prepare for your exams.

Help yourself prepare for exams

Recognise the symptoms of stress

Stress suppresses your immune system so you're more likely to catch a cold or feel under the weather, which doesn't help your performance in exams. Temporary effects of stress include: 

  • lack of concentration
  • inability to sleep
  • difficulty in processing information
  • irritability.

In high levels, stress can lead to mental health problems e.g. depression or anxiety. Check out the LiveWell website for more advice on surviving exams or our information about anxiety and stress

Sources of support

Most importantly, if you feel that your exam anxiety is building up to a point where sleep is difficult, your health is suffering or your relationships with your friends and family are affected you need to seek some help. Talk to your personal tutor or doctor. Support available on campus includes Student Support & Engagement TeamStudent WellbeingFaith & Reflection and SUBU Advice. You can also find further information on the Health & Wellbeing webpages or read some of our BU student blogs for advice direct from a fellow student:

Togetherall

Don’t forget, all BU students can sign up, for free, to Togetherall, an online mental health and wellbeing service offering self-help programmes, resources and peer support. Clinically-trained advisers are also available 24/7 and it’s all completely anonymous. This can be a good resource if you're not sure about contacting Student Wellbeing, or perhaps while we're processing your registration or between appointments.

There's also a range of other online support which you might find useful, such as: